Oncotarget’s Journal Shares Insightful and Accessible Medical Research Publications

Oncotarget is a peer-reviewed free access journal published weekly and covering various aspects of oncology research. It was started in 2010 and aims at making scientific results available while maximizing its impact through insightful reviews. The journal envisions a future where important discoveries are shared rapidly, and different biomedical fields are linked. The journal also hopes to enhance clinical and basic science in the fight against diseases.

Publications by Oncotarget Journal

On March 6th, 2017, Oncotarget published a journal in which Fabian V. Flipp, UC Merced professor, had mapped out melanoma’s genetic landscape and pinpointed a drug that was capable of battling the disease. In an interview, Mr. Flipp explained that the precision medicine sheds light on which drugs are effective to an individual’s unique epigenetic and genetic makeup. Mr. Flipp’s direction toward precision targeting proves that it is possible to control cancer through regulating epigenetic factors and hormone receptors at the same time. Oncotarget is also available on Dove Press.

A study by the University of Rochester Medical Center suggests that electronic cigarettes are as much harmful to teeth and gums as conventional cigarettes. The study led by Irfan Rahman, an Environmental Medicine professor at the UR School of Medicine and Dentistry, was published in Oncotarget. The study addresses the detrimental effects of e-cigarettes on oral health at a molecular and cellular level and is the first of its kind. Mr. Rahman explained that burnt vapors from e-cigarettes cause the release of inflammatory proteins which increase stress within cells causing damage that may result to oral diseases.

Watanabe-Smith is a postdoctoral fellow at the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute. Mr. Watanabe highlights that mutations are inclusive in our lives; he compares mutations to text message typos as they are mistakes found in a gene. However, he emphasizes that the major issue lies in which mutations are cancer causing and further asserts that the problem may pose a challenge if an efficient model system to test these mutations is not available. Mr. Watanabe’s research sought to understand one particular mutation in a leukemia test, which was published in the Oncotarget journal. While he was working on the model system, he encountered a new problem in which unexpected and additional gene mutation popped up every time he tried to sequence the patient’s DNA. That is why he decided to study this phenomenon.

Download output styles at Endnote.com

Leave a Reply